Compare Home Loans for Great Honeymoon Rates

While it’s most important for homebuyers to think about every aspect of their loan options, it also makes sense to compare home loans so you can take advantage of great honeymoon rates. Having a few years of fixed interest rates could help you save money for future repayments.

Comparing Honeymoon Rates

Many lenders use honeymoon rates to attract new clients. These fixed rates can last from one year to ten years. In most cases, you get the lowest honeymoon rate when you choose a small introductory period. One year will usually give you a considerably lower rate than ten years.

It’s important to compare these honeymoon rates to make sure you save as much money as possible. Interest rates can differ considerably from lender to lender. Ask the home loan companies to give you comprehensive lists of their honeymoon rates. That way, you can compare them side by side.

 Consider How Interest Rates Might Change

Having a low introductory rate can help you save money, but when you compare home loans you also need to think about how your rate will change after the honeymoon period. In some cases, you might find that higher interest rates offset the savings that you might get from the honeymoon rate. In other cases, though, you might find that you still get a good deal even after the introductory period ends.

If you expect your financial situation to change dramatically over the next five to ten years, then you could benefit from low honeymoon rates even when you know the rate will increase considerably in a few years. Honeymoon rates can make your home more affordable for one or more years while you save money and earn a higher income. When your income increases, you can afford the higher interest rate.

Before you can decide this, though, you have to compare all aspects of the loan and take an honest look at your finances.

 

This post was submitted by Tomorrow Finance – An Australian Mortgage Comparison Website.

Talk to Your Child about Students Loans and Smart College Plans

More and more, we are hearing about students who are buried under a mountain of student loan debt. Some default and suffer severe consequences. Others manage to pay back the loans, but the minimum payments are so high, they have to move back in with their parents and don’t pay off the loans for 20 or even 30 years. Meanwhile, their lives are on hold.

Instead, take the time to talk with your child about student loans. Many students who have such a high debt load chose to go to expensive private or out-of-state colleges.  Examine the many choices that are available. Can your child go to a community college first?  Can he or she get a good education at a local university? Using both of these strategies will cut your child’s student loan debt immensely.

Remind your student of life stages she may miss out on or have to delay if she has a five or six figure student loan debt:

  1. Home ownership.  Many people buy a home once they graduate from college, if they are not burdened with student loan debt.  Home ownership has many advantages—you have your own space, you can take advantage of significant tax deductions, and you are not “throwing your money away” as some say you are if you rent for a long period of time. In the current economic climate, interest rates are so low that a home loan is even more affordable. However, if your child has student loans with expensive monthly payments, he can’t take advantage of the power of home ownership.
  2. Getting married. The median marriage age for women is 25 and 27 for men.  However, young professionals who are deep in debt often push back this time frame until their 30s. If both your child and her partner have debt, they could be in an even more difficult financial situation. Many delay marriage until they have reduced their student loan debt considerably.
  3. Having children. Just as these students delay getting married, they also delay having children. Having children is expensive, and when the majority of your money is going for student loan repayment, thinking about the tenants of “adulthood” such as home ownership, marriage and children, can seem out of reach.
  4. Retirement savings. Many college graduates initially neglect their retirement savings so they can apply more money to their student loan debt.  However, they then miss out on the power of compound interest that can make their retirement savings stretch further. Instead, they wait to invest until their mid to late thirties, when they will have to invest more for the same retirement they could have had if they had started investing in their twenties with less money.

Often students don’t realize the consequences of deciding which college to attend. Take the time to explain to your child how much student loan debt can burden their future and their ability to buy a home, get married, have children and save for retirement.